Why I Would Have Shaken A Tambourine

Because when people can address an issue so clearly, you let them, and encourage others to read their thoughts.

Under the Saltire Flag

tambourine3

On the Eve Of the Battle

Right on the eve of battle, there was dissent. While the Tambourine Army, a band of fierce Jamaican feminists, were getting ready to blow the abeng and stage their Women’s Empowerment March, the British/Jamaican Blogger and activist, Emma Caroline Lewis, took to her keyboard and blogged ‘Why I won’t be Shaking A Tambourine’. Shit got real very quickly. In the contentious Social Media back and forth that ensued, lines were drawn, names were called, people were trolled and people were blocked.

I say that lines were drawn, and they were, and yet it is not easy to make sense of the complexity of sides that people took. Many who read Emma’s blog – many women in fact – felt that she had bravely expressed their own misgivings – misgivings they had either been too afraid to say or had felt without having the…

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40 Years Since Cubana 455 Was Bombed

Today at 11am at the Atrium of the Piarco International Airport a plaque will be unveiled to memorialise the bombing of Cubana flight 455. An exhibition explaining the circumstances surrounding the bombing will also be launched.

Minister of National Security Edmund Dillon and Minister of Foreign Affairs Dennis Moses will join  Cuban Ambassador Vazquez Moreno  and Venezuelan Ambassador Coromoto Godoy in welcoming a Cuban delegation to Trinidad and Tobago. The Cuban Delegation includes Fernando González – one of the five Cubans who was imprisoned in the United States, and who was released when the U-S and Cuba re-established diplomatic relations; Camilo Rojo – who is a relative of one of the Cubans killed in the Cubana bombing; and Tania Parra , an official of the Cuban Institute of Friendship with the Peoples (ICAP).

Brief information about the Bombing of Cubana #455

On October 6, 1976 Cubana flight 455 was blown up off the coast of Barbados. All 73 persons on board died the flight were killed. They included 57 Cubans (of whom 24 were members of the Cuban national fencing team that had just won all the gold medals at the just completed CAC games); 11 were Guyanese (5 of whom were students on their way to Havana to study medicine, plus the wife of a Guyanese diplomat); 5 were North Koreans.

Two men – Freddy Lugo and Herman Ricardo Lozarno – arrived in Trinidad on October 5, then left on the Cubana flight for Barbados. They got off in Barbados and returned to Trinidad. However, the two bombs in their luggage remained on board the Cubana flight and blew up 10 minutes after take-off.

They were arrested in Trinidad, and confessed to the crime implicating two Cuban-Americans who were in Venezuela at the time. Those men, Luis Posada Carrlies and Orlando Bosch, were then arrested in Caracas on October 14.

Following a senior government meeting between officials from T&T, Barbados, Cuba, Guyana and Venezuela in Trinidad on October 20th, a decision was taken to try Lugo and Lozarno in Venezuela. They were then deported from Trinidad to Venezuela.

Jamaica Biennial 2017

The National Gallery of Jamaica is pleased to invite submissions for the juried section of upcoming Jamaica Biennial, which will now be held from February 26 to May 28, 2017 and will thus be the Jamaica Biennial 2017. The Jamaica Biennial, previously known as the National Biennial, is the National Gallery’s flagship biennial exhibition. Designed […]

via Jamaica Biennial 2017: Call for Submissions – Juried Section — National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

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Notes on presenting a Soundscape

The physical environment Indoor environments are better because of how the sound travels in space. The soundscape maybe tailored to the type of space it will be presented in. Specific audio playbac…

Source: Notes on presenting a Soundscape

So proud of my friend Afifa for the groundbreaking work she is doing.

How the Language of Jamaica Became Mainstream — Repeating Islands

[Many thanks to Peter Jordens for bringing this item to our attention.] Eternity Martis (The Fader, 1 September 2016) writes about the trajectory of patois on the global stage concluding that “more than just slang—it’s a language of freedom.” [. . .] Patois, as well as its hybridized diasporic slang, is a language used by […]

via How the Language of Jamaica Became Mainstream — Repeating Islands

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A Caribbean Culture Reader

Meagan Sylvester shared this on her page last September 2nd. It popped up in my Facebook reminder and I thought, that this is the best place to post it, because it’s such a great list of papers and essays on our music and Carnival customs etc. So without further adieu:

Mason, Peter. 1998. Bacchanal? The Carnival Culture of Trinidad. London; Philadelphia: Latin American Bureau; Temple University Press.

Liverpool, Hollis Urban. 1998. Origins of rituals and customs in the Trinidad Carnival: African or European?. TDR/The Drama Review 42, no. 3: 24-37.

Liverpool, Hollis. 2001. Rituals of Power and Rebellion: The Carnival Tradition in Trinidad and Tobago, 1763 – 1962. Chicago, Trinidad and Tobago: Research Associates School Times; Frontline Distribution.

Stolzoff, Norman C. 2000. Wake the Town and Tell the People; DanceHall Culture in Jamaica. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Rouse, Marilyn A. 2000. Jamaican Folk Music: A Synthesis of Many Cultures. Studies in the History and Interpretation of Music. Vol. 66. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.

Regis, Louis. 1999. The Political Calypso: True Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago, 1962 – 1987. Barbados; Gainesville: Press University of the West Indies; University Press of Florida

Besson, Gerard, and Angostura Bitters Limited. 2001. The Angostura Historical Digest of Trinidad and Tobago. Cascade, Trinidad and Tobago: Paria Pub.: Angostura.

Cowley, John. 1996. Carnival and Calypso: Traditions in the Making. Cambridge; New York, NY: Cambidge University Press.

Dudley, Shannon. 2008.Music from Behind the Bridge: Steelband Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.

Dudley, Shannon. 2004. Carnival Music in Trinidad: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. Global Music Series. New York: Oxford University Press.

Elder, J.D. 1972. From Congo Drum to Steelband: A Socio-Historical Account of the Emergence and Evolution of the Trinidad Steel Orchestra. St. Augustine, Trinidad: The University of the West Indies.

Feld, Steven. 1984. Sound Structure as Social structure. Ethnomusicology 28 (3): 383-409.

Frith, Simon. 1996. Performing Rites: On the value of popular music. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Gibbons, Rawle. 1994. No Surrender: A biography of the Growling Tiger. Tunapuna, Pantheon Books.

Guilbault, Jocelyne. 2007. Governing Sound: the cultural politics of Trinidad’s carnival musics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hill, Donald R. 1993. Calypso Callaloo : Early carnival music in Trinidad. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.

Lipsitz, George. 2007. Footsteps in the Dark: The Hidden Histories of Popular Music. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Liverpool, Hollis. 1990. Kaiso and Society. Diego Martin, Trinidad, W.I.: Juba Publications.

Nettleford, Rex M. 1995; 2002. Calypso monograph. Caribbean Quarterly Monograph. Mona, Jamaica: Caribbean Quarterly.

Rausert,Wilifried. 2000. Negotiating Temporal Differences: blues, jazz and Narrativity in African American Culture. Heidelberg, Germany: Heidelberg.

Rohlehr, Gordon. 1990. Calypso & Society in Pre-Independence Trinidad. Port-of-Spain, Trinidad: G. Rohlehr.

Ryan, Selwyn D., Gloria Gordon. 1988. Trinidad and Tobago: The Independence Experience, 1962-1987. The University of the West Indies. Institute of Social and Economic Research St. Augustine, Trinidad: Institute of Social and Economic Research, The University of the West Indies.

Stone, Ruth M., Verlon L. Stone. 1981. Event, Feedback and Analysis: Research Media in the Study of Music Events. Ethnomusicology. Vol 25 (2): 215-225.

Williams, Eric Eustace. 1984. From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, 1492-1969. 1st Vintage Books ed. New York: Vintage Books.

Williams, Eric Eustace. 1964. History of the people of Trinidad and Tobago. New York: Praeger.

Alleyne, Mike. 2009. Globalisation and Commercialisation of Caribbean Music. World Music Roots and Routes. Collegium. Tuulikki Pietila. (ed). Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 6. Helsinki: Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. 76–101.

Hope, Donna. 2006. Inna De DanceHall: Popular Culture and the Politics of Identity. Kingston: Jamaica. The University of the West Indies Press.

Howard, Dennis. 2012. Rantin from Inside the Dancehall. Jamaica: Jahmento Publishers