Dancehall vs Soca

There’s a conversation that takes place in Jamaica about Dancehall versus Soca very regularly. And that conversation gets very heated around Jamaica Carnival.

It’s a hard conversation for me to listen to, because having lived in Jamaica – I studied at UWI, Mona – I hear the xenophobia in the comments. Too often when Jamaican talk about soca, there’s shade and there’s the blatant attacks. The Jamaican who likes Soca isn’t in the majority. And this upsets me, because Trinidad plays Dancehall like if it’s we ting on radio. Local DJs love to talk in pseudo-Jamaican accents on the radio, but where the music we love is getting made, they scorning Soca. And why shoudn’t they, when we don’t love it enough ourselves.

I think it’s worthy of note that Jamaicans don’t seem to be as threatened by or condescending of Rap and Hip Hop, as they are of Soca.

Having said that, I think that it is funny that if you switch the accents and location, this is a very similar to the conversations we’ve had about Dancehall. Not as heated, but I am both amused and shocked to see Soca being spoken of as though it is a threat to Dancehall. And that has me wondering if something else is at play.

I want you to look at the current affairs show All Angles. Dionne Jackson-Miller hosted a panel that included Dr. Kai Baratt, Marlon Campbell and Dr. Donna Hope. At some point, while watching it, I started to realise that the way Soca was introduced to Jamaica was completely at odds with it’s origins. And that disconnect is jarring. I find Jamaica Carnival’s positioning as an elitist festival very disturbing. Always have. While Trinidad Carnival has created the all-inclusive model that contributes to it’s increasingly upper class tone, because it’s “we ting”, our lower classes feel entitled to it in ways lower class Jamaicans do not. So while there are attempts to make Carnival “all-inclusive” with the view to exclude; the Jamettes, the Saga boys and the Bwa Men who created de ting have the real ownership of the mas, and will find a space, always.

I think that Jamaica needs to re-visit it’s relationship with Carnival. They have to find a way to make it true to them, in a positive way. And that positive has to be more than benefits it may add to it’s tourism model.

That said, I’m way more interested in Trinidad Carnival and fixing what ails us. And for me, that’s such a difficult question to answer, I guess because it’s emotional.

 

COCO Dance is Launched

The launch took place Thursday evening. Watching the performance live was interesting, because he walks through the audience and it had a very immersive feel to it. which is insufficiently captured on camera. It also helped having him explain it to you, but I’m reminded of my previous discussion with co-founder of COCO, Sonja Dumas who cautioned against needing to understand the performance. She suggests that audiences are better served just going with their feelings.

COCO Dance Festival starts this weekend, and continues next weekend, check it out.

COCO Dance Festival

The Contemporary Choreographers’ Collective or COCO is hosting their annual Dance Festival.

I’m really excited to see them add a video element. Founding member of COCO Sonia Dumas, has become quite the filmmaker of late. Fresh off her win at #TTFF16 for a film development prize, this addition of film to COCO Dance Fest is a lovely surprise. Dumas has already produced a film on local dances pioneers called Julia and Joyce.

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The COCO Video Festival will offer screenings and workshops at The Little Carib Theatre. See the flyer above for details.

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First, that’s my friend Elisha Bartels in the above image. She’s a bess dancer, and frighteningly brilliant, so conversations with her are always edifying.

I’m most excited to see the dance productions at COCO fest. I have pleasant memories of Dave Williams, another founding member of COCO, and his inventive shows at the Carib.

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Dance Pioneer Beryl McBurnie’s House Destroyed

A portion of Trinidad and Tobago’s artistic community is up in arms about the demolition of Beryl McBurnie‘s house, a property that was shortlisted by the National Trust — the organisation charged with safeguarding the country’s heritage sites — to be considered for protected status. The house was bulldozed to the ground on September 16.

Read the rest on Global Voices.