Holy Week Art Exhibition

Michiel van Hout created the Holy Week Art Exhibition to help him find a space in the local art scene for his work. Michiel is a religious artist, and for him his work is a reflection of his faith. It is also part of his spiritual practice.

The Holy Week Art Exhibition was created because when he moved Trinidad, he found that religious art didn’t really have a space here, which he found very surprising considering how spiritual this country is.

The 2017 exhibition ended on Glorious Saturday, but I did a story on it for the C News Report, have a look

I really his geometric, stained glass-like paintings the best. Antonio Figuero’s paintings of the Cathedral and the Church of the Assumption were lovely as well, as was Rebecca Foster’s “Stations of the Cross”. I hope that some of these find spaces in local churches and homes very soon.

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Woodbrook Sans

“There aren’t many indigenous typefaces from the English-speaking Caribbean; barely any in fact. There is a kind of vernacular around handwritten signs, one of which was created by our Managing Partner Marlon Darbeau’s work for Alice Yard; more recently with digitisation projects such as the Fete Signs project by the talented duo of Kriston Chen and our own Agyei Archer. Contemporary typography doesn’t so much originate here; looking for a typeface that is ‘authentically Caribbean’ really means looking elsewhere.

What we do have are legacy faces; echoes of systems and powers that have long departed, quietly reminding us of the past.

The shared history of the English-speaking Caribbean means that there are similarities in style across the region. One can in particular find a loose group of typefaces that seems to speak of empire, of order, of plain protestant authority.”

Taken from Abovegroup’s blog about rebuilding their identity. I just love the idea of a new, font of Caribbean origin.

Brian Mac Farlane and the Controversy of Mas

His 2017 presentation, Cazabon: The Art of Living was supposed to celebrate our heritage architecture and the period when those buildings, like the members of the Magnificent 7 were built.

The problems were present from the get go. Those buildings were constructed in the 20th century. While George Brown, the architect who designed the fret work that has become the hallmark of the gingerbread houses moved to Trinidad before Cazabon died, they had little interaction. So the association is messy.

brian-madness
WTF Brian?

But what really upset some people was the section La Belle Dame and Garçon de la Maison. The beautiful woman and the house boy. It glamourised a relationship where one of the partners, in this case the overly sexualised houseboy, wasn’t an equal partner, and probably couldn’t refuse the relationship if he wasn’t interested. Regardless of how beautiful his mistress may have been.

Earlier this week, the band leader held a Facebook live discussion where he apologised for causing offense and dropped the section.

You can read his statement in full here and his website www.Macfarlanemas.com is now live.

I had an interesting conversation with a lecturer in Carnival Studies about this controversy, Trinidad Carnival’s history and society. I also spoke to the leading expert on Cazabon about this. I’m working on that piece now, and hope to have it ready for broadcast soon.

Ajoupa Open Studio Event

Ajoupa’s annual Open Studio Event will be held November 12 and 13, 2016 from 10am – 6pm on Saturday and Sunday.

You can enjoy the beautiful gardens and picnic with the butterflies and hummingbirds, weather permitting.

This year the open studio will feature the paintings of Shinhuey Ho, glass jewelry and gifts from Kristy Johnson, handmade porcelain pottery by GretaMichelle Joachim, plants and mosaic by Kelly Anderson and Arty Party painting events by Sharon Burford.

Owner of Ajoupa Bunty O’Connor will have her sculpture on show and available for purchase. Look out for her “village of stray dogs, fired in the raku style and lots of chickens!”

Follow the map on the website or call if you get lost, 705 9693.
Website: www.ajoupapottery.com

 

Colour the Caribbean


Because I’m a cliché, I have an obsession with colouring and colouring books. It’s fun, it’s art with training wheels, because I haven’t drawn a thing in years. I needed an outlet and colouring books are it.

I’ve been dying to find books that are more my style, so fashion themes are a fave. As are pop culture, and abstract patterns. But what I really, want are books that are more representative of where I live, the Caribbean, and the type of woman I am, Black. So I made a list of Caribbean colouring books for all ages.

Some of the adult colouring books I own, will own soon (Amazon is processing the order), or would like to own. A few are no longer being printed, which is sad, but I have a thing for history, so I included them. I will separate my list of colouring books for children, from the list for adults.

Adult Colouring Books.

  • Escape Colouring Books. Jade Gedeon’s lovely series, book 4 is coming out in February, and I can’t wait, because I’ve been longing for a Carnival colouring book. I can’t wait to get my hands on it. I’ve finally ordered her first 2, and they are on their way. The reviews are amazing! The books are Island Escape, Rainforest Escape and Carnival Escape.
  • Dear:… A Healing Colouring Book: I literally harassed Danielle for her colouring book. Actually no, she was pregnant at the time, so we just spoke via Facebook messenger and I rushed over to Paper Based Bookshop in the nick of time to snag my copy. If she reprints the Wildflower Series Colouring Book I will get one because her illustrations are gorgeous.
  • James Hackett: It’s not out yet, but he says one is coming. I can’t wait.

Children’s Colouring Books

  • ZW Colouring Book: I discovered Zaidee Walker’s book randomly during a Sunday morning breakfast run to the San Antonio Green Market, which is right by me. Her drawings are simple, but the possibilities are endless. I bought 2. One for me, and gave the other to my co-worker’s daughter. It’s simply done, and you can probably beg her to produce a copy for you.
  • MacMillan’s Caribbean Colouring Books: The series still pops up, offering false hope, but the Caribbean Flowers book is out of print. The entire series seems to cater for a wide range of skills, like the Caribbean Carnivals book is suitable for a younger child but the Caribbean Flowers books seems more advanced.
  • Coloring Book of the Caribbean: is a Virgin Islands based book that may only be available via this website.
  • Traditional Carnival Characters of Trinidad and Tobago: I think that this book is out of print, but you may be able to contact them directly for a copy, or lead a groundswell of interest to justify  a reprint.

The problem in the Caribbean is single print runs, so books go out of print very quickly even though the interest has far outlasted supply. To be fair though, interest can be a slow burn. I blame that on insufficient marketing, but I digress.

Happy Caribbean colouring!

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Danielle Boodoo-Fortune 2016 Wasafiri New Poet

Talented artist Danielle Boodoo-Fortune is the winner of the Wasafiri New Writing Prize- Poetry for her poem Portrait of my father as a grouper.

Wasafiri is a UK-based international magazine on contemporary writing. It is published quarterly. The name comes from the Kiswahili word for ‘travellers’.The magazine was formed out of a deliberate initiative to introduce a more diverse set of books to British school libraries and reading lists.

She’s also a brilliant artist. I have one of her colouring books, but her watercolours are stunning. She’s just really very talented.

 

Jamaica Biennial 2017

The National Gallery of Jamaica is pleased to invite submissions for the juried section of upcoming Jamaica Biennial, which will now be held from February 26 to May 28, 2017 and will thus be the Jamaica Biennial 2017. The Jamaica Biennial, previously known as the National Biennial, is the National Gallery’s flagship biennial exhibition. Designed […]

via Jamaica Biennial 2017: Call for Submissions – Juried Section — National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

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